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Gingivitis, periodontitis

Did you know that more than half of the population over 30, and more than 85% over 45 has 3 mm deep periodontal pockets, what indicates periodontitis?

The gingivitis, the inflammation of the gum is only the beginning of the way leading to periodontitis and then to tooth loss.

The gingivitis is the inflammatory reaction of the tissues around the tooth. As the inflammation progresses, bone, gum and periodontium will be damaged, a pocket full of bacteria forms between the teeth and gum. This pocket, as a permanent source of infection, affects the functions of the whole body, resulting in various side effects, discomfort, serious secondary diseases. 

Some warning signs:
  • Oversensitive gum or tooth neck
  • Bleeding of gum
  • Swollen gum
  • Redness
  • Small blisters on the gum
  • Pain
This is a nearly unnoticeable and not self-stopping process, progressing in some years inevitably to loosening and then to loss of teeth and implants. Generally the patient learns to late, that she or he is facing tooth loss.

The periodontitis is a more severe stage of the gingivitis, in which bacterial colonies are forming, the gums are receding, and the tooth necks will be exposed. The shrinking extends from the gum to the inner tissues. The gum and the bone are continuously receding; the teeth are emerging more and more from the gum and bone tissue, and ultimately the teeth fall out. If the process is not stopped, even tooth replacement by implants becomes complicated, sometimes almost impossible. Risks of tooth loss are to be learned in young adult age, in order to allow prevention in due time, and then it won’t be too late!

It is a misbelief that tooth loss is related to older ages, tooth loss can occur earlier than most of the patients would have thought. 

The periodontitis can be managed!

PeriOdontitis Dental Implantation Risk Analysis PODIRA

Did you know that more than half of the population over 30, and more than 85% over 45 has 3 mm deep periodontal pockets, which indicates periodontitis?